What Color should I make that Box/Popup/Widget/Icon…?

My recent project involved designing a dashboard/control panel. What I played around the most with was the colors. I changed the header image to a variety of colors.

In his “7 Rules for Creating Gorgeous UI”, Erik Kennedy’s second rule is to start designing in grayscale, so one can focus on the layout and organization of the elements. It makes sense to me. He also demonstrates how when you design in grayscale, you can just add one color and everything looks visually appealing. Here are two of his examples:

I’m considering changing my portfolio to incorporate this concept. It looks really modern, but also photo-centered, which I’m unsure is appropriate for a UX Design portfolio.

Ian Storm Taylor goes on top say “Never Use Black”. It’s unnatural in the real-world – shadows aren’t black themselves. He pushes for saturation and the use of dark greys, playing around with brightness and hues. I remember considering using black in one of my designs and ditched it for dark grey. It looks much better.

Finally, this resource would be definitely helpful for myself. I have to play a lot around with what color goes well with another. I remember showing a prototype to some friends who instantly comment, “that blue and green don’t go well together” – and they don’t, I never thought they did either. Dribble allows you to see what other designers have usedfor color combinations. I looked up the blue color which I tend to gravitate towards, and just realized how good it looks paired with orange. I never thought of that – I tried green and yellow before, but I’ll definitely want to try orange in the future.

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Egotism vs. Empathy in User-Centered Design

Does self-centeredness hinder effective UX design? It seems like it would.

We may describe a self-centered person as arrogant, intolerant of differing opinions, overconfident, and lack empathy. In addition, they can’t see different viewpoints. They are usually fixated on their own viewpoint and may harshly criticize others who don’t buy into their views. The Huffington Post even wrote an article “How to Deal with Self-Centered People” to shed advice on those particular individuals prevalent in our workplace and schools.

Egotism’s counterpart is empathy, often touted as an essential in UX Design in reference to utilizing personas. A persona is a (largely) fictional snapshot of a typical user. Personas enable designers to focus on a manageable and memorable cast of characters. It ensures designers keep in mind that they are designing for a specific somebody, rather than just generic people. If designers lose this sense of empathy, they may end up designing for nobody. Smashing Magazine wrote a compelling article on the possible effectiveness and reasoning behind personas.

Sure, personas can be sketched out, but do all designers know how to utilize the full potential of personas? Maybe self-centered people have difficulty relating even to the fictitious personas in front of them, especially if it goes anywhere near the line of empathizing with a possibly less adept or a less tech-savvy thinker. In an industry where brains is commended, prevalent, and sought, there ought to be those who are more on the egotistical side. Those would be the ones saying, “only an idiot would think that way” or asking, “how could someone be so foolish?”. How effective can a self-centered person be at user-centered design?

Source: http://asinthecity.com/

Source: asinthecity.com